22 thoughts on “Urban Geography Blog Assignment #4 – 2017 – China overcrowding

  1. This set of images which shows the residential development in China during the current period of rapid urban growth reflects social and economic problems in some cities. The fast urbanization, development of business sector at the national level, and foreign investment have led to developed sector industries, increased tourism and a fast increase in the middle classes of the community. As a result of that, there has been a high demand for lands that have strategical location for such industry and businesses. Consequently, poor society are being expel from there place to the city fringes where labors are far from their work place, and students are far away from their education place as well. Most of the housing areas in China urban are weak in the basic infrastructure and necessary services; these services include poor housing, piped water, sanitation, roads, health care, and electricity. In many China cities, a high percentage of population lives in illegal housing where the infrastructure and services are poor, and in very few cities can most of their lower-income population find reasonable quality with basic services. Also, there is increasing numbers of urban poor families who are living far away from their jobs in city centers because they were relocated here or only in this place can they afford land. For example, it is common in Beijing, for a parson within low-income households spends two hours to travel from their living place to their employment place (Satterthwaite, 2008). Furthermore, the houses in China are expansive. For example, in Hong Kong the rent of housing is really high which reaches about $ 900 for a month, and that is not to rent a house but to share a room. People live in a small place. Most of people live in 300 to 900 square feet per family and a massive apartment building, and some of them live in an apartment which is one room, they sleep, cook, study, and store their things at the same place. Some live as a family, signal, or some share a room with another person who sometimes is not related to the partner. Others cannot afford living in a room, so they live in containers with overcrowded housing where if any fire occurs, it will be extremely dangerous. The electricity in these places is unregulated and water is not available. In general, people have bad health. This kind of housing is illegal, but the government allows that because it needs this people who are cheap labors. The government of China does not let people live on the street and be homeless, so it tries to put solutions for this situation. One of the solutions is to provide cages for these people who cannot afford the cost of a house to buy or rent, so we can see people who live in small cages in a room including one small bath and one kitchen, and the number of the cages in the room depends on the size of that room; it is about 9 to 12 cages.
    References:
    Satterthwaite, D. (2008). Understanding Asian Cities: A Synthesis of the Findings from Eight City Case Studies. Global Urban Development GUD, http://www.globalurban.org/GUDMag08Vol4Iss2/Satterthwaite.htm

  2. China has seen rapid transition since the shift to high privatization in the 1980s and 1990s. Investment in the country has been high, but those feeling the direct consequences are the people of China. The population of the country is in the billions, and poverty has affected a significant portion of this number. The communist government of China seeks investment from foreign nations into the country, and it cares little about individuals. Images in this post prove that although the country is booming economically, people are not. Individuals flocked to the urban scene as the state’s economy grew, but opportunities have not increased equally. People came for jobs and incomes, but they were difficult to find.
    Because China is a booming nation with high tourism and foreign investment, the homeless population is maintained by the state. People who cannot afford to live in homes do not live on the streets, rather they are issued cages. Homeless people live in cages just large enough to sleep in, and these cages may be stacked four tall in a room. I do not know what’s worse: living on the street or living indoors in a cage surrounded by people. Considered homeless people are issued places to live, this makes me wonder if they should be considered homeless.
    Living in an apartment in China is a step up to living in a cage, but it is not that much better. The top pictures in this post prove that overcrowding in China is high. Apartments are small, often less than 10×10 square feet for one individual, yet rent is astronomical. Those who can afford larger apartments than these usually have roommates, and they are usually individual rooms with a sink next to a stove. Apartments are packed next to each other and there is no breathing room.
    The bottom right picture shows the contrast that exists between economic investment and economic despair. Countries from around the world invest in Chinese markets, which are competitive by design. Companies also flock to the country because labor is cheap. Tall skyscrapers are plentiful in the country to house economic activity, but investment in the social sphere is low. Many people are considered middle class yet struggling unreasonably, which is why they may dry their clothes on a bridge. The state may not like seeing poor people by their internationally-recognized buildings, but considering the state does not care about individuals, the problem continues.
    Communism and dictatorial leaders have dominated China for so long that the people of the nation have sought change multiple times. The Tiananmen Square incident was an effort by protestors to challenge the state’s neglect to the people, but considering the people’s voices were unwanted, many people were killed. The economy has proven incapable of serving the middle and lower classes for decades and people need change. Another instance of state neglect to the people is in the case of jobs. As foreign investment and privatization has increased in China, many jobs were lost. Families have seen smaller incomes and individuals have suffered finding new jobs in the highly competitive world. The state does not seem to care that people have seen the direct consequences of the economic shift. Leaders of China care about being competitive in the globalized world, and they have left citizens to feel the consequences.

  3. China is currently enjoying a period of unprecedented economic growth. This massive economic influx has resulted in the rise and rapid development of massive urban centers. Images of these areas reveal shanty-towns of hastily constructed apartment complexes, towering above over-crowded streets. Residential sectors of carbon copy construction dot these urban centers, attempting to compensate for the rapid move inward by the population. Evoking imagery much like that of architecture within the Soviet bloc, these urban environments have grown in a way that is not entirely communist, nor entirely western. Chinese urban planners are tasked with controlling and guiding one of the largest economic booms in recent history, yet when planning for such large numbers, it appears the individual is often forgotten.

    Looking up from the streets, a lattice like ladder of laundry lines climbs upward. AC units hang on to windows like boulders on a cliff face. These tiny, identical apartments often house more than one individual, and as the view from the street suggests, space is tight. Comfort is not considered during construction, and the individuals that move inward for opportunity are not left with much to call their own. The urban planners tasked with creation are often faced with incredibly tough decisions. Deciding where these high-rise apartments go often requires dealing with poor or non-existent infrastructure. Thus, commodities that are considered essential in the West are often lacking or simply unavailable. Cities such as Beijing and Shanghai stretch for kilometers in all directions, including up.

    Transit through these streets can take hours, and when movement slows, it often chokes entire areas. For your average citizen, long walks are expected, resulting in tightly packed streets and sidewalks. As a relatively new world economy, much of China’s urban development has been recent and rapid. The speed necessitated by this boom is clear in construction, as well as the streets. Open-air markets often sit alongside monolithic sky-scrapers, a relic and reminder of the cultural tradition once present in these cities. Ancient neighborhoods and landmarks are often redeveloped as needed, visibly transforming classical China into the economic powerhouse it is today. As the past is cleared for the future, conformity overtakes creativity. Trading ornate original architecture for clustered complexes leaves the map scarred and scourged. Residences repeat and repeat for miles, and skylines are oppressively uninteresting.

    The pressures of proximity push people into tight spaces. Industrial development is affected by this pressure as well, and for residents, this means adapting to massive amounts of pollution. Smog sits below the clouds, often blocking the sun from view, while light pollution blots out the evening sky. Citizens can expect health effects from exposure, and the environment is constantly corrupted. Controlling this pollution is one of the hardest tasks future urban planners face. In many ways, countries display their values through their construction.

    The utilitarian nature of construction in China forgoes quality and personality in favor of performance, and over the next few decades, time will decide whether this style is worthwhile. Today, we can only hope that efforts are made to construct with a more humanitarian focus.

    References :

    Yu, Howard. “This Is Why China’s Housing Market Is Such a Mess.” Fortune.com. Time Inc., 10 Feb. 2016. Web. 2017. .

  4. Rapid urbanization in China has created many social, economic, and environmental issues negatively influencing citizens or the cities. China has over one hundred cities with populations exceeding one million. The cities did not prepare well for this population boom causing present conditions to be unsustainable and dangerous for the people living in the cities. The overpopulation of these cities, does not allow the city to function as efficiently as it was designed to.
    To start off, China designed its cities to have an industry concentrated core. This is not always a harmful idea, but most China cities did not factor in the human element when designing. “Commerce, services [and] even community” were not factored into most city designs in China (Langfang). This leaves people living in the city feeling dehumanized with minimal access to green space, community centers, and other amenities. Even the architecture leaves people feeling desensitized because of its high density, height, and uniform design. High density housing is great for cities but only when designers accommodate adequate space per dwelling and creating a maximum height of the housing. After a building exceeds a certain height, people living in the dwellings are elevated so high from the ground that they feel disconnected from the city, the street, and from people. High density housing stimulates a feeling of isolation despite close proximity to others. This isolation can be a result of many things but one of them being the lack of community in a larger city.
    One tragedy occurring in these over populated cities is the poor standard of living for the lower class. As depicted above tens of thousands of people are forced to pay rent to live in 6’x2.5’ cages in a room with nine to twelve roommates. These rooms are void of a kitchen and bathrooms, often only having one sink which is the only source of running water. Residents living in this room often result to washing their clothes in a bucket. Having a cage next to a window is considered a privilege. These living conditions are inhumane and it’s disgusting that the government allows this to happen. I understand this fixing this issue would be a long process due to the multitudes living in these conditions but the city needs to find a better way to accommodate this population.
    The cost of renting a residential space had increased so much that it has forced a large population to start renting cubicle apartments. These spaces are continually gaining popularity but this type of living is not ideal either. Cubicle apartments are often subdivided between many families meaning that ten or more people will be living in a space created for around three people. This leads to “inadequate hospitals, schools and affordable housing” because “planners often ignore the needs of 200m or more residents” who do not have an urban “hukou” which is a certificate necessary to access public services (Langfang).
    This density also negatively effects the environment. More and more residents are buying personal vehicles which leads to high rates of carbon dioxide emissions. This leads to a large amount of smog making the city a poisonous place to be. (Word Count 525).
    Langfang. “The Great Sprawl of China.” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 22 Jan. 2015. Web. 26 Mar. 2017.
    Press, Nick Enoch And Associated. “Where Home Is a Metal Cage: How Tens of Thousands of Hong Kong’s Poorest Are Forced to Live in 6ft by 2ft Rabbit Hutches.” Daily Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 05 Mar. 2015. Web. 26 Mar. 2017.

  5. The problems illustrated in these images of residential development in China highlight the problems that arose after the 1980’s when the Chinese government began to sell off parts of the state to foreign investors. The rich got richer and the poor got poorer, resulting in the mass overcrowding of cities. In this case, the overcrowding has become more extreme than a regular densely populated city center, with people having to face seemingly impossible living conditions, such as renting out a cage to live in as shown in one of the pictures in order to most likely work in a factory setting to make the small amount of money that they live on after paying ridiculous amounts of rent on unworthy living conditions. Because the local government is no longer involved in the market, there is no one that lives locally that has the power to advocate for it and work to make a change for the well being of the people that live in these cramped and unhealthy living conditions. These unfortunate circumstances lead people to participate in illegal acts such as sex-trade and child trafficking which in turn make the already miserable city center not only dense and polluted, but also unsafe. The pollution that comes from the decaying city system with broken down sewer systems continues the push on the dissatisfying city life. It contributes to heath problems to these people who are already pushing their bodies to the limits working in unsafe jobs, in unhealthy environments with no green space to escape to. The city center where population is so dense is essentially a concrete jungle, which does not provide vital services that nature does for peoples’ mental and physical well being. Again with the lack of interference by governing bodies continues to allow this derelict way of living to occur. These people have lost their voices because of their financial standing that forces them to blend into the huge amounts of people crammed into these areas. The bad areas continue to be bad with no one to step in and say weather or not a place is “livable”. Standards of living become seemingly non-existent with families living in areas as small as one small room. Single people can be found living in the cage like structures as mentioned above, at times sharing a large room with multiple other adults. Running water is dangerously provided with wiring being connected at times with no proper safety buffers. But with this being the only option that some people have to keep them off of the streets, it is the option that so many people in China have been forced to take. Living conditions are squandered in order to simply live where these people have no option to escape into a society where individualism is held in higher regard than survival. The high cost of rent, along with the high cost of food and transportation in this unregulated state will continue to force the population into these bad living conditions in a cycle that will be hard to break.

  6. China is world’s most populated country accounting for 1.4 billion people. Images presented here show the challenges that China as a country is dealing nowadays. Rapid development and urbanization has offered the opportunity for high rates of migration and urban sprawl and economic development that is challenging other economies of developed world. This led to massive agricultural and land loss. China’s economic policy is focused on rapid urbanization where cities of more than 1 and 10 million people are increasing rapidly, out of 30 world cities with over 10 million people 11 are in China. China focuses on a policy of a foreign investment and rapid economic development which has provided the country with major urban growth but with problems at the same time. However, this policy favors people connected with government rather than normal citizens.
    This urban growth has brought in challenges for China. They face air pollution and high density in residential buildings, waste management is another issue in the urban sprawl of these cities. This is due to the high rates of rural to urban migration that has occurred in China over the last 20 years. China has the largest public housing in the world. Still that does not solve the issue of overcrowding. Yet, this is not enough to accommodate all the people migrating to bigger cities in China. Furthermore, urban population in China is expected to achieve 1 billion by 2050. Residents living in these social hosing do not have access to clean water and proper waste management system, let alone heating during the winter. People live in poverty and slums in different areas in the cities, also a significant number of them live in warehouses in terrible conditions with minimum space, a place only supposed to spend the night. Those slum neighborhoods present a problem to the increasing economy of China. Since they cannot relocate the residents they allow these slums to exist even in the center of the cities. A different case is in Hong Kong. They built public housing in a Corbusier style with high density buildings, to offer housing to the migrants coming from rural areas, and to prevent slums appearing in the city. The migration is due to the higher employment opportunities offered in urban areas. People living in urban areas work long hours in factories all around China. They are not provided with health care and their wages are low, a characteristic for cities of Global South. The increase in rapid urbanization brought environmental challenges as well. Cities demand for energy and water will double in the next decade. This high density of urban population causes increase in the transportation. Although there are investments being made in public transportation, number of cars in streets has increases in 64 million in the last decade. This presents an increasing problem in pollution that the government attempts to tackle. A middle class of population that has benefited and became wealthy now live in the suburbs of the cities. Few can afford that lifestyle. They live in private neighborhoods, a model like that from US, with all the necessary amenities. The government is trying to mitigate the effect this rapid urbanization has on the environment by drafting policies that will lower the effect of gas emission or air pollution, but still that seems a challenge they must work hard to overcome.
    http://www.economist.com/news/china/21640396-how-fix-chinese-cities-great-sprawl-china

  7. China is currently enjoying a period of unprecedented economic growth. This massive economic influx has resulted in the rise and rapid development of massive urban centers. Images of these areas reveal shanty-towns of hastily constructed apartment complexes, towering above over-crowded streets. Residential sectors of carbon copy construction dot these urban centers, attempting to compensate for the rapid move inward by the population. Evoking imagery much like that of architecture within the Soviet bloc, these urban environments have grown in a way that is not entirely communist, nor entirely western. Chinese urban planners are tasked with controlling and guiding one of the largest economic booms in recent history, yet when planning for such large numbers, it appears the individual is often forgotten.

    Looking up from the streets, a lattice like ladder of laundry lines climbs upward. AC units hang on to windows like boulders on a cliff face. These tiny, identical apartments often house more than one individual, and as the view from the street suggests, space is tight. Comfort is not considered during construction, and the individuals that move inward for opportunity are not left with much to call their own. The urban planners tasked with creation are often faced with incredibly tough decisions. Deciding where these high-rise apartments go often requires dealing with poor or non-existent infrastructure. Thus, commodities that are considered essential in the West are often lacking or simply unavailable. Cities such as Beijing and Shanghai stretch for kilometers in all directions, including up.

    Transit through these streets can take hours, and when movement slows, it often chokes entire areas. For your average citizen, long walks are expected, resulting in tightly packed streets and sidewalks. As a relatively new world economy, much of China’s urban development has been recent and rapid. The speed necessitated by this boom is clear in construction, as well as the streets. Open-air markets often sit alongside monolithic sky-scrapers, a relic and reminder of the cultural tradition once present in these cities. Ancient neighborhoods and landmarks are often redeveloped as needed, visibly transforming classical China into the economic powerhouse it is today. As the past is cleared for the future, conformity overtakes creativity. Trading ornate original architecture for clustered complexes leaves the map scarred and scourged. Residences repeat and repeat for miles, and skylines are oppressively uninteresting.

    The pressures of proximity push people into tight spaces. Industrial development is affected by this pressure as well, and for residents, this means adapting to massive amounts of pollution. Smog sits below the clouds, often blocking the sun from view, while light pollution blots out the evening sky. Citizens can expect health effects from exposure, and the environment is constantly corrupted. Controlling this pollution is one of the hardest tasks future urban planners face. In many ways, countries display their values through their construction.
    The utilitarian nature of construction in China forgoes quality and personality in favor of performance, and over the next few decades, time will decide whether this style is worthwhile. Today, we can only hope that efforts are made to construct with a more humanitarian focus.

    References :

    Yu, Howard. “This Is Why China’s Housing Market Is Such a Mess.” Fortune.com. Time Inc., 10 Feb. 2016. Web. 2017. .

  8. China overcrowding
    In the 20th century Communist China created planned cities. This led to large scale urban resettlement. Post-Communist China still sees rapid rural to urban migration and growth. The cities are centers for jobs, education, and more. But with the population growing exponentially faster than the infrastructure, informal housing becomes an issue. For every square kilometer in China, there are 139.6 people. (Business Insider)
    One big issue is pollution. Emissions from vehicles and factories create blinding fog that is hazardous on many levels. Food is a little bit of an issue because of the ratio of farmer to eater. But China does a good job of feeding people the basics.
    I believe the greatest issue for Urban China is housing. The cities are increasing at such a rate, that people are forced to rent 6x4x2 cages in warehouses. Some people live in old shipping containers. These houses create some many dangers. Exposed wires and poor plumbing can lead to shocks and fires. Overcrowding leads to waste buildup and disease. Many of these neighborhoods also run an informal economy often organized by gangs. Drugs and prostitution are prevalent. Kunming Drug Rehabilitation Center, the largest in the world is home to nearly 4,000 addicts. (Business Insider) At least China is trying to combat the drug problem.
    Even wealthy families are forced to live in one room apartments that make our dorm rooms looks like palaces. China’s overcrowding is due to communist policies post WW2 that were created in hopes of providing people to sustain the country, but the country produced more than it could provide for.
    Insufficient housing, pollution, gangs, drugs, and prostitution are all side effects of China’s rapid urban growth as well as its rapid technological growth. Much of the rural to urban migration is due to job opportunities in technology and manufacturing. These jobs come from high global demand for cheap Chinese products. These factories create smog and overcrowding.
    Reflecting on these issues has made me realize that American consumerism (Berkley Boys aside) has possibly played a role in these terrible living conditions for millions of Chinese people. What kind of action should America has a nation play in this crisis? What is my responsibility as an individual?
    While China sits on the world stage for military, education, and technology, it lacks the ability to sustain its population in a healthy way. Like much of the global South, China’s current situation is the result of leaders making the best short term decisions and letting the people suffer the consequences long after they have left power.
    My biggest take away from this discussion is prudence. If we can think ahead about the global impact of our choices, not just now, but 100+ years from now, I believe our lives will look much different and the lives of future generations can be much better.

  9. china did not always have this overpopulation problem. it was not until after World War II when Mao told his people to have as many kids as possible. thinking this would improve china’s economy by bring in more laborer and allowing more food to be produced and money to be made. they also thought this would help them build a better army and also bring in more mind to improve upon other social infrastructure. but what they did not account for was the massive increase in population that would now need housing and medical care. from the year 1949-1970 Chinas population grew from 118 million people to 712 million people. the fertility rates sky rocketed to 7.4 kids per woman. which is why china had to began their one child laws which reduced the growth rate to 2.1 per woman. Chinas current population is upwards on 1.35 billion. but the overpopulation in china is not the same in every region in the coastal regions you should expect to see around 400 people per square kilometer. while in the mountain regions are more like 10 per square mile. this excessive amount of people in such the city puts everyone there in a horrible situation because of the overcrowding. for one the housing is cramped and usually is not ready for any natural disasters such as earthquakes. some people do not even actually live in normal housing they live in shipping crates or cages set up to look like bedrooms. the crime rate among these because of the population density and the lack of law enforcement in these areas. there is also the problem with pollution and the lack of green space in these major Chinese urban areas. people are also forced to live extremely far distances from where they work or go to school which really hurts the economy and stunts its growth.

    overpopulation in china february 13, 2014 published in asia pacific – https://www.codewit.com/asia-pacific/15717-overpopulation-in-china
    UKEssays: the effects of china’s large population published 23rd march, 2015 https://www.ukessays.com/essays/sociology/the-effects-of-chinas-large-population.php

  10. With 1.3 billion people, China is currently the most populated country in the world and the numbers will only continue to grow on into the future. There are 363.3 people per every square mile in China. As the Chinese population continues to grow and grow and the available resources of the nation cannot keep up, overpopulation will continue to affect the Chinese people at an exponential rate. China is in the midst of a massive urbanization and as millions of migrants move into the cities, housing becomes an increasingly decreasing resource. Overcrowding in cities and poor housing conditions were always a factor when China provided extensive public housing properties to the working class population up until the last couple of decades. Since then, the government has sold off those massive housing blocs to private industries and encouraged them to continue the effort which has alleviated the overcrowding pressure for some but the influx of workers into Chinese cities has exceeded the supply of affordable housing. Housing prices have also soared because of this massive influx of migrants into cities with the national average home price increasing by 250% within a decade. According to the criteria for affordable housing established by the U.N., China falls into a housing/income ratio that is classified as “severely unaffordable.” As we can see in the top images, the housing in these massively dense Chinese cities are incredibly compact and built to go up. While this may look like a typical urban environment, it is far from sustainable. These buildings are definitely not mix use or multi-purpose; they are only for housing as much of the population as possible. For many migrant workers, the second image down on the left is what they call home: small cages of living space stacked one on top of the other. In China, there is an internal passport system called the Household Registration System that classifies migrants as outside the qualifications for a legal resident which restricts them from welfare benefits like subsidized housing for years. So it seems as if the system to help the poor afford housing is geared towards keeping affordable housing out of the hands of the nation’s most poor. The lower right image depicts what is probably a leftover government housing building that was more than likely privatized. The look of these buildings follows the traditional Chinese pattern of gated superblocks which function like an entire suburb condensed into one high-rise. Near buildings like these, it is not uncommon to find very poorly designed or nonexistent public infrastructure. Traffic may be absolutely terrible as the roads can’t handle the amount of people using them. Sidewalks may be nowhere to be found leaving to dangerous conditions whilst trying to commute. Any number of issues can arise simply from the population demanding more than anyone can provide. As China continues to urbanize and develop in the future, affordable housing reform will become an absolute necessity or else the country might just crash under its own weight.
    Sources:
    Youqin, Huang. Lack of Affordable Housing Threatens China’s Urban Dream. https://www.chinadialogue.net/article/show/single/en/6365-Lack-of-affordable-housing-threatens-China-s-urban-dream
    Calthorpe, Peter. China Chokes on High-Density Sprawl. https://www.cnu.org/publicsquare/china-chokes-high-density-sprawl

  11. China pop history China has retained the crown for population size for centuries. Its first post war census, 1953, the population stood at 583 million; by the firth census in 2000, the population had more than doubled, reaching 1.2 billion people. They had reached the billion mark by 1982. 91% of the population is Han Chinese the remaining 9% was consisted of other minorities. The population growth is strictly monitored and regulated which started in the late 20th century. Due to its one child, policy there is a serious gender imbalance. This situation has led to government to ban selective abortions of female fetuses. They are also facing a graying of their population that is similar to ours.
    Chinas urban growth exploded in the late 70’s because of the opening of its markets to the world. The increased flow of foreign direct investment created massive employment opportunities. Migration into urban areas is highly regulated and restricted, due to china communist government; in 1985, about 33% of its population was urban. China even devolved a strategy to control urban growth, by strictly limiting the size of big cities, developing several medium sized cities, and actively encouraging the growth of smaller cities. In times that are more recent the Chinese government has started to demolish older rural villages and preemptively building new cities and towns to relocate the displaced villagers. The goal is to have 70% of Chinas population into cities by 2025.
    Real estate bubble The 2005 Chinese property bubble was a real estate bubble that started to deflate in 2011. The phenomenon saw the average house price to triple from 2005-2009, mostly driven by government policies and cultural attitudes. These costs on property has led to an estimated 64 million empty homes/apartments in China. There are reports of whole cities in the hinterlands that are brand new, but are devoid of life. This bubble has left its poorest citizens with either homeless or a ward of the state. Due to the increased cost of property ownership, there is a rise in rental properties and a new type of rental, the cage home. This cage home is a small metal cage with a lock. They come in different sizes but the average size is four feet tall by five and a half feet long and three feet wide. These “homes” are gaining popularity, mainly in Hong Kong where nearly half of its population lives in public housing.
    Those cages make for a scary future. It can lead to dehumanization of the poorest population. These people are already down on their luck, and to living in a cage barely big enough to put a dog inside. That is horrible and inhumane. When there are thousands of empty properties throughout china to put these people in. This practice is crazy to it and me shows how much closer to animals we have become as a society. The indifference of man and its plight towards one another really is appalling to me. We need to strive for big changes in our world, namely extraterrestrial colonization! We should be striving for that, not only as a plan b, but also to better our human society

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s