42 thoughts on “Geography of Europe 2017 – Blog#1

  1. Shortly after the second World War, a genre known as Scandinavian noir started to become popular in the Scandinavian countries. It’s breadth of popularity has grown greatly in the time since, becoming popular in many other Western countries. These stories started out as books and short stories, with many of them being adapted for screenplay in both film and television, including some big budget productions. Scandinavian noir is usually very dark in nature. It often centers around a murder with detectives attempting to figure out who the murderer is. This lays the ground work for what Scandinavian noir is known for, morally complex issues. Often leading to difficult and dark subjects like rape and racism. The characters in these stories must navigate and deal with the depravity of mankind.
    It’s difficult to determine why these stories resonate so much in Scandinavian culture. One potential reason is the climate that this area experiences. It’s usually very cold, especially in the winter, with lots of cloud cover year-round. This climate creates a very gloomy atmosphere. Sunshine is often used to represent happiness, energy, and enthusiasm, and it’s natural to assume and feel that cloudy weather and lack of sunshine, especially with much shorter days in the winter time, that the general mood would be quite downtrodden and pessimistic. It’s also possible that Scandinavia, historically, has been relatively isolated from the rest of Europe. In the modern era, this isn’t as much of an issue, but historically, it is very difficult to travel, even short distances, in the cold. Snow and ice make travel especially difficult. This may mean that populations and villages would be relatively isolated from even other Scandinavian populations in the past. Isolation and a lack of exposure can bring out the worst in people and potentially give way to more depraved actions and thoughts. This is why you rarely see cults in major cities, they’re almost always in smaller town and villages where they can isolate themselves and fester. Exposure almost always eradicates and dampens these effects. It’s possible that Scandinavian culture has had more exposure to the experience that relative isolation brings and are more aware of its effects. This doesn’t mean that every village in Scandinavia is the home of murderous, psychopathic racist rapists, but that, overall, it may have slightly more exposure to it. This may be some of the same reasons that metal is so popular in these countries too.
    The reasons that its popularity has grown both in Scandinavia and across the rest of the world, may be because people enjoy contemplating the moral conundrums that Scandinavian noir forces readers to face. It challenges readers preconceived notions of morality and makes them rethink moral positions that they may have held for many years, because it is presented to them from a new perspective. Many of the problems these stories deal with are the result of isolation, and when they expose them, it forces the reader, and the characters in the stories, to confront them.

  2. The Nordic countries can be very bleak places. In an area where the physical geography is often far-reaching glacial tundra and brutally cold winters with sunlight hours dwindling, it’s not entirely surprising that personalities and culture have veered into more dark and disturbing arenas. Currently, Nordic countries make up 5 of the top 6 European countries for anti-depression medication use. At the top of the list is Iceland where over 10% of the population uses antidepressants daily. However, according to the 2017 World Happiness Report released by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network for the United Nations, those 5 Nordic countries are also in the top 10 happiest countries in the world with Norway at the top of the list and depressed Iceland in third place. These statistics pose the question of “how can a geographic region marked by gloom and depression also be considered some of the happiest countries in the world?” Well, I believe it is because the Nordic countries and their cultures share a very interesting connection to their geographic position and the positive (and dark) impacts on their shared fictions. Recently, symbiotic relationship can be seen in the globally-growing genre work of Nordic Noir books, film, and television that tell (often gruesome) crime stories from the unique perspectives of the Nordic world.
    Most Nordic Noir has common underlying themes that are often tied to together by three factors: language, heroes, and setting. The language of Nordic Noir crime novels, as described by literary agent Niclas Salomonsson, is “realistic, simple and precise… and stripped of unnecessary words.” The language is brutal and cold; just like the climate. The heroes of Nordic Noir crime stories are often standard cops and detectives just trying to do their jobs and handle their own personal demons. Most are struggling, dysfunctional, and working with flaws: alcoholic, emotionally troubled, depressed, or defiant. These weathered and weary heroes reflect the flaws of the system in their actions. Finally, the setting of these crime fictions are politically charged and critical of the “Nordic system.” In a region defined by productive welfare that cares for each and every citizen, there exists a dark underbelly that Nordic Noir seeks to expose. Nordic Noir often deals with the hypocrisy found in the welfare system and those with power that seek to manipulate it at the expense of the vulnerable impoverished.
    The most internationally popular and recognizable example of Nordic Noir is the Millennium novel series by Stieg Larsson. While the entire original novel trilogy has seen a film adaption in native Sweden, the first novel in the series, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, also an American film adaption from director David Fincher. The most popular example of Nordic Noir television is the series The Killing which become a cult hit in the United Kingdom before finding an audience (and an American adaption) across the Atlantic.
    Noir novels and film grew out of the need to tell important stories that reflected societal issues and growing concerns in modern times. Through this lens, it is easy to understand why the Nordic countries were so quick to import and adapt the genre of noir (and, side note, the genre of Metal in music) for themselves. They are a culture of people living under and economic and political model that is unique and catered specifically towards their geographically distinct countries. They have frustrations and issues and stories to tell and release them through a form of fiction that begs for dark storytelling methods.

    “Inspector Norse” The Economist. http://www.economist.com/node/15660846

  3. Nordic noir, particularly that coming from Scandinavia, is a literary genre that emerged post World War II. The origins of this movement are credited to Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö, who are know for the Martin Beck series that first appeared in 1965. Ever since its introduction, it has quickly gained popularity and momentum in modern society. Some notorious author’s and their works include “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larsson, “Smella’s Sense of Snow” by Peter Hoey, and the Kurt Wallander detective series by Henning Mankell. Scandinavian noir’s popularity still persists to this day as its influence has reached across Europe and into the U.S. Scandinavian Noir has even been adapted to the world of television and film. This not only includes film adaptations of already existing Noir titles such as “The girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” but also includes regular TV programming with titles such as “The Killing”, or “Trapped.”

    Scandinavian Noir is defined as being a genre of crime fiction that is almost exclusively in the perspective of police/detectives, that often have a troubled past or some form of internal struggle that the protagonist must face. The language is rather simple and is often set in some bleak, dreary, and sordid landscape while the tone and style are also structurally dark and somber. Themes that are prevalent in this genre include misogyny, rape, and murder, along with various other complex social issues. The noir genre became an instant hit as it focused on subjects under the surface of society. It explores moral dilemmas, complex ethical issues, along with various taboo and controversial subject matter that go to demonstrate the pessimistic and evil aspect of mankind.

    As for why this genre emerged from the Nordic region, there are a few probable factors that contribute. Chris and Jacob above, they both make excellent points about the geography having a role to play. These lands are classified as a relatively “isolated” tundra. The cold along with the atmosphere contribute to a bleak and dreary setting which may have been the inspiration for the fiction. The strange phenomenon is that the Nordic region is considered one of the best places to live in the world with data demonstrating very high happiness rates. A probable factor that explains why Nordic Noir is so popular is that the subjects are considered taboo. Such a place, with happy citizens, it almost makes sense that literature is the outlet to explore topics that are outside of sight and mind. Through the genre, writers can critique society and scratch underneath the surface at morally complex issues, government functionalism, murder, rape, and so much more. These factors contribute to making Scandinavian Noir unique and specific for the region, however, it is not a cultural anomaly. Places around the world use literature, film, arts, and music to critique society. It is an efficient outlet as they generate large audiences and can be easily related to. All the same can even be said for the popularity of metal music in the Nordic region. It is an outlet in which the people are united and can serve to look deeper into various topics.

  4. Originating as a literary genre that emerged out of World War II, Scandinavian Noir has grown to be a very popular genre throughout the Western World, portrayed through many popular books, TV Shows, and films. Scandinavian Noir is a type of crime fiction written through the voices/point of view of the police or detectives who are often worn down by cares and are not your everyday superheroes or simply heroic. The genre worked on breaking the common stereotype of crime fiction as something simply following the everyday tasks of the police force and has embedded a lot of social criticism into the dark scenes. The genre really began with the Martin Beck series, which truly looked into and criticized Swedish society unlike ever before. The genre truly spread and became very well known worldwide after the release of the Millenium trilogy in the early 2000’s. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo is a critically acclaimed novel and film, along with the other two stories also in the series.
    The genre became very popular because of the openness of this social criticism. As a society that is often seen as “put together” and having everything figured out, Scandinavia is often painted as having a very bleak front, as a society with no problems where there is apparent equality, social justice, and liberalism which covers up the darker issues that the countries face. Scandinavian Noir challenges this idea, and blatantly portrays the misogyny, racism, and other dark things hiding under the picture-perfect portrayal of Scandinavia. The writing style of this genre is very realistic, simple, and precise and without too much metaphor. For example, the Millenium trilogy covers the issues of rape and misogyny while another series may cover the issues of Scandinavia’s unwillingness to allow immigrants to enter their countries.
    Along with this, the mood is always very dark and the scenes are very bleak with many neutral colors. This is important as it portrays the issues that Scandinavians face of the often very bleak and cold weather and climate. This is a nightmare, as many people face a bout of depression when faced with a cold and cloudy place. It’s like Seasonal Depression Disorder year round and can cause a lot of turmoil within oneself, which transfers into the population itself. Combine this with the inherent need to always hide any problems that may arise and you have a very bottled up population, bound to be shaken up to explode. Noir has allowed the Scandinavian people to really express these issues and discuss them, it is a vulnerable being within a society that almost seems utopian at times, as the economic success can often paint a place to be. I believe that it has spread in popularity because behind the facade that people usually like to place around themselves that everything is happy-go-lucky, there is a want for something that is real and raw, something almost untamed.
    Along with Noir, there is a vast love for metal music in Scandinavia. It could be due to the bleak weather and climate that tends to be associated with gloom and metal is a way to release the gloom, but it could also be a multitude of other things. Some say that the “do as thou wilt” ideas behind Scandinavian Law allow metal to prosper, as it is a very specific form of self-expression.
    Ultimately, the Scandinavian population, though very put together, is also into some very dark matter. Gloom = doom?

  5. Originating as a literary genre that emerged out of World War II, Scandinavian Noir has grown to be a very popular genre throughout the Western World, portrayed through many popular books, TV Shows, and films. Scandinavian Noir is a type of crime fiction written through the voices/point of view of the police or detectives who are often worn down by cares and are not your everyday superheroes or simply heroic. The genre worked on breaking the common stereotype of crime fiction as something simply following the everyday tasks of the police force and has embedded a lot of social criticism into the dark scenes. The genre really began with the Martin Beck series, which truly looked into and criticized Swedish society unlike ever before. The genre truly spread and became very well known worldwide after the release of the Millenium trilogy in the early 2000’s. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo is a critically acclaimed novel and film, along with the other two stories also in the series.
    The genre became very popular because of the openness of this social criticism. As a society that is often seen as “put together” and having everything figured out, Scandinavia is often painted as having a very bleak front, as a society with no problems where there is apparent equality, social justice, and liberalism which covers up the darker issues that the countries face. Scandinavian Noir challenges this idea, and blatantly portrays the misogyny, racism, and other dark things hiding under the picture-perfect portrayal of Scandinavia. The writing style of this genre is very realistic, simple, and precise and without too much metaphor. For example, the Millenium trilogy covers the issues of rape and misogyny while another series may cover the issues of Scandinavia’s unwillingness to allow immigrants to enter their countries.
    Along with this, the mood is always very dark and the scenes are very bleak with many neutral colors. This is important as it portrays the issues that scandinavians face of the often very bleak and cold weather and climate. This is a nightmare, as many people face a bout of depression when faced with a cold and cloudy place. It’s like Seasonal Depression Disorder year round and can cause a lot of turmoil within oneself, which transfers into the population itself. Combine this with the inherent need to always hide any problems that may arise and you have a very bottled up population, bound to be shaken up to explode. Noir has allowed the Scandinavian people to really express these issues and discuss them, it is a vulnerable being within a society that almost seems utopian at times, as the economic success can often paint a place to be. I believe that it has spread in popularity because behind the facade that people usually like to place around themselves that everything is happy-go-lucky, there is a want for something that is real and raw, something almost untamed.
    Along with Noir, there is a vast love for metal music in Scandinavia. It could be due to the bleak weather and climate that tends to be associated with gloom and metal is a way to release the gloom, but it could also be a multitude of other things. Some say that the “do as thou wilt” ideas behind Scandinavian Law allow metal to prosper, as it is a very specific form of self-expression. Ultimately, Scandinavians are into some very dark things. Gloom = doom?

  6. Originating as a literary genre that emerged out of World War II, Scandinavian Noir has grown to be a very popular genre throughout the Western World, portrayed through many popular books, TV Shows, and films. Scandinavian Noir is a type of crime fiction written through the voices/point of view of the police or detectives who are often worn down by cares and are not your everyday superheroes or simply heroic. The genre worked on breaking the common stereotype of crime fiction as something simply following the everyday tasks of the police force and has embedded a lot of social criticism into the dark scenes. The genre really began with the Martin Beck series, which truly looked into and criticized Swedish society unlike ever before. The genre truly spread and became very well known worldwide after the release of the Millenium trilogy in the early 2000’s. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo is a critically acclaimed novel and film, along with the other two stories also in the series.
    The genre became very popular because of the openness of this social criticism. As a society that is often seen as “put together” and having everything figured out, Scandinavia is often painted as having a very bleak front, as a society with no problems where there is apparent equality, social justice, and liberalism which covers up the darker issues that the countries face. Scandinavian Noir challenges this idea, and blatantly portrays the misogyny, racism, and other dark things hiding under the picture-perfect portrayal of Scandinavia. The writing style of this genre is very realistic, simple, and precise and without too much metaphor. For example, the Millenium trilogy covers the issues of rape and misogyny while another series may cover the issues of Scandinavia’s unwillingness to allow immigrants to enter their countries.
    Along with this, the mood is always very dark and the scenes are very bleak with many neutral colors. This is important as it portrays the issues that scandinavians face of the often very bleak and cold weather and climate. This is a nightmare, as many people face a bout of depression when faced with a cold and cloudy place. It’s like Seasonal Depression Disorder year round and can cause a lot of turmoil within oneself, which transfers into the population itself. Combine this with the inherent need to always hide any problems that may arise and you have a very bottled up population, bound to be shaken up to explode. Noir has allowed the Scandinavian people to really express these issues and discuss them, it is a vulnerable being within a society that almost seems utopian at times, as the economic success can often paint a place to be. I believe that it has spread in popularity because behind the facade that people usually like to place around themselves that everything is happy-go-lucky, there is a want for something that is real and raw, something almost untamed.
    Along with Noir, there is a vast love for metal music in Scandinavia. It could be due to the bleak weather and climate that tends to be associated with gloom and metal is a way to release the gloom, but it could also be a multitude of other things. Some say that the “do as thou wilt” ideas behind Scandinavian Law allow metal to prosper, as it is a very specific form of self-expression. Ultimately, Scandinavians are into some very dark things. Gloom = doom?

  7. Nordic Noir began as small stories or books that now it has become a multi- million dollar industry in the last couple of years and has expanded all over the world receiving many awards for their literary genre. The Nordic Noir began in Scandinavia during the 1940’s that has later extended to film and television drama. It is a crime fiction with a viewpoint from police officers that experience difficult situation one would not encounter on an everyday situation such as murders and rape. It brings out an unexpected twist from what one usually imagines Scandinavia to be.
    I believe this genre began being popular in this area because the way society functions or has set rules that people always follow, it is a society with no problems and is very open to people that think differently from the rest. They are a very organized society and nothing from what is read in the Nordic Noir books is ever expected to happen in Scandinavia which brings out a different feeling to the readers because it is about something they don’t experience every day and can’t really relate to it. Scandinavia it is known for being very different from the rest of Europe in general, they are very segregated therefore they have more opportunities to come up with different subjects from the rest of the world because they don’t have the influence of other societies. On the other hand they receive inspiration from other sources, the latitude of the country has a lot with how the people are, the weather being gloomy and cold with little sunshine must effect on how the people behave and feel, in weather like these people tend to be more reserved and less outgoing which creates mysterious thoughts and inspiration to write such books. This is probably why there is also a huge influence on metallic music, especially with recent generations which has increased demand for this style of music. It is thought that this music is inspired as late as the Vikings which use loud and harsh vocals. Metal bands have participated on Euro-vision and won which created a lot of critical thought about the genre but at the same time it allowed the style to be widely known worldwide creating a stereotype for this type of music.

    In conclusion, the northern countries tend to be darker not because of the people or what they listen or read but because the position in which they find themselves on Earth. Weather can change someone’s mood very quickly and being in a country where the sun barely shines inspires people to write dark and mysterious songs and books. People from Scandinavia have been raised very different from the rest of the world, they have their own educational system which creates a different way of thinking being open to diversity as well as accepting their differences and being tolerant. The famous band and Nordic Noir genre is not only famous on the Scandinavian region but it has expanded to the rest of the world.

  8. Nordic Noir began as small stories or books that now it has become a multi- million dollar industry in the last couple of years and has expanded all over the world receiving many awards for their literary genre. The Nordic Noir began in Scandinavia during the 1940’s that has later extended to film and television drama. It is a crime fiction with a viewpoint from police officers that experience difficult situation one would not encounter on an everyday situation such as murders and rape. It brings out an unexpected twist from what one usually imagines Scandinavia to be.
    I believe this genre began being popular in this area because the way society functions or has set rules that people always follow, it is a society with no problems and is very open to people that think differently from the rest. They are a very organized society and nothing from what is read in the Nordic Noir books is ever expected to happen in Scandinavia which brings out a different feeling to the readers because it is about something they don’t experience every day and can’t really relate to it. Scandinavia it is known for being very different from the rest of Europe in general, they are very segregated therefore they have more opportunities to come up with different subjects from the rest of the world because they don’t have the influence of other societies. On the other hand they receive inspiration from other sources, the latitude of the country has a lot with how the people are, the weather being gloomy and cold with little sunshine must effect on how the people behave and feel, in weather like these people tend to be more reserved and less outgoing which creates mysterious thoughts and inspiration to write such books. This is probably why there is also a huge influence on metallic music, especially with recent generations which has increased demand for this style of music. It is thought that this music is inspired as late as the Vikings which use loud and harsh vocals. Metal bands have participated on Eurovision and won which created a lot of critical thought about the genre but at the same time it allowed the style to be widely known worldwide creating a stereotype for this type of music.
    In conclusion, the northern countries tend to be darker not because of the people or what they listen or read but because the position in which they find themselves on Earth. Weather can change someone’s mood very quickly and being in a country where the sun barely shines inspires people to write dark and mysterious songs and books. People from Scandinavia have been raised very different from the rest of the world, they have their own educational system which creates a different way of thinking being open to diversity as well as accepting their differences and being tolerant. The famous band and Nordic Noir genre is not only famous on the Scandinavian region but it has expanded to the rest of the world.

  9. Scandinavia is not an aesthetically happy region in the world, and while yes it has beautiful sites and regions, these Nordic countries are often laden with cold cloud-covered skies. Therefore, to the casual onlooker things such as Scandinavian Noir and Death Metal seem right at home in this region, but Scandinavia is home to some of the happiest and well-off countries in the world. So what gives?
    After the Second World War the Nordic countries began to rebuild under new ideas of Free Market and Welfare economics seated underneath stable democratic governments, and this system worked out. Personal income skyrocketed, public health drastically improved, and the consumption of bleak and depressing media hit an all-time high. Wait, what? These people have all they could want and they choose to watch and listen to media that hinges on feelings of despair? Now the easy explanation would argue that this is just due to the climate of the region; its cold and stormy weather doesn’t necessarily scream for show tunes. However, as one digs deeper this factor has less and less weight. The true reason can be explained by the long-standing culture of these people. Culturally, Scandinavians are a very reserved and emotionally bland in their daily activities. The extremes of society are less emphasized, and that is exactly why they are so desired. Economic prosperity often drives people to look outside of their normal wants to something even more external, and in a society in which expressive emotions and public problems are traditionally absent, a media that is full of expression and difficult situations provides for the apparent lack of that. This is where Noir comes into the equation and later Death Metal. Noir is this gritty, serious style of television involving drastic situations that, though exciting, are terrifying to imagine. The main characters are normal people thrust into these problems and often the shows are imbued with much of the social criticisms of the time. Some of the best examples of Noir include “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” novel and even the American copycat noir series “The Killing” which I myself find very compelling.
    The other piece to the puzzle includes the world of Death Metal. Its messages are often the same as Scandinavian Noir; confronting the harsh parts of life, expressing sadness, and using dark/violent devices as their substance. Though the name itself was enough reason my mother was afraid of my listening to it, the messages become very relatable, especially to a mass audience seeking a more powerful form of expression. Some of the most well-known Metal bands include Apocalyptica and System of a Down. Scandinavian Death Metal sticks to its roots, however, unlike the many American and Western-European groups that seek to insert popular elements into their sound to appeal to larger audiences. This Death Metal keeps its system of strong guitar leads with a singer that varies between low-deep foreboding sounds and quick scream-like intensive sounds. Their initially shocking style of music quickly caught on and today a very large number of Europeans enjoy Death Metal as their primary form of music.
    In the end, the uniqueness of Scandinavian Noir and Death Metal may have been a product of the region’s society, but the rest of the world has not been opposed to its further rise. These genres continue to grow as the world continues to prosper. Perhaps this will become a staple in other countries in the decades to come.

  10. Nordic noir, a uniquely Scandinavian take on the noir genre, is rooted in the post-World War II era. The United States, in its efforts to rebuild Europe as a friendly, capitalist continent, pumped millions of dollars into Europe’s economic and physical redevelopment. Primarily through the Marshall Plan, the United States created a captive market for its products, including cultural exports. American film and media flooded European markets, and while the surge was not enough to fully supplant the native culture, it worked its way into the fabric of regional media. In Scandinavia, American noir mysteries resonated with the local audiences and evolved into the distinct, European genre.

    While classic American noir is known for its dark, gritty environments and morally grey heroes, Nordic noir amplifies these characteristics. Postwar Scandinavia is a highly successful region; effective social programs, high living standards, and stable politics make for a comparatively happy and content population. Yet, despite such comforts, the region’s most famous media is known for its gruesome murder mysteries and bleak, dreary cinematography. Lacking almost entirely in obvious humor or heartwarming stories, Scandinavian noir media severely contrasts with the relative ease of living in Europe’s far north. Series like Stieg Larsson’s Millennium novels have even attracted international acclaim for their uniquely blunt and unflinching character. The genre has even influenced media produced outside of the region. British media has even taken to producing its own flavor, with shows like the BBC’s Luther adopting the genre’s marking characteristics. Nordic noir and its regional offshoots have found a large fanbase in the United States as, and even Hollywood has tried its hand at reproducing an Americanized version of the once American-inspired genre.

    The genre’s appeal is likely twofold. First, and perhaps most obvious, is the region’s weather. Sunlight and warm summer days come at a premium in the far north as the region’s climate and latitude both conspire to bring long, dark winters. Though northern Europeans undoubtedly have a greater tolerance for grey days, their moods must still suffer from the season. Beset by darkness, one would likely feel more inspired to write on dark subjects than light, happy media. From my own experiences, I certainly do not feel like constantly creating nor consuming bright and cheery media on cold, damp days. Metal’s Scandinavian stronghold likely plays off the same sentiments and some subgenres feature similarly dark themes. The second factor plays off the first; the region’s prosperity and relative happiness makes media saturated with corny, idealistic themes unappealing. Like when one eats too many sweets, too much of the same themes can make one sick. Additionally, noir’s stark contrast with daily life allows for an effective vehicle for social commentary. Though all may seem well on the surface, this media allows for a much more honest, if not exaggerated, look under the hood of Scandinavian society. While I am not deeply familiar with the genre, my secondhand knowledge of the Millennium series fits the bill through the characters’ many unfettered prejudices. As the genre’s popularity grows in the United States, perhaps us Americans will come to understand and adapt the dark subtleties of Nordic noir to our own social commentary.

  11. Film noir, in general, is said to have originated after WWII and focused on tones and settings that were generally more pessimistic. Scandinavian noir takes a blend of nordic crime novels and film noir to establish a film criteria set upon bleak settings and dark subject matters. Typically told from a police point of view, the genre has gained much more popularity among other European countries as well as the United States. Despite its name, nordic noir is not so much limited to its Scandinavian regions as much to the origins of those involved but may as well be associated with other regions along with different meanings and symbolism. However, one of the most noted characteristics of nordic noir, that makes its name, is the realistic concerns over social life underneath all that that made up the welfare state. To summarize, the cities seem ridden with crime and characters all seem to have some sad and difficult backstory. The films are set in a world where landscape and language are cold, both in color and mood.
    Prior to WWI, films had previously focused on sensationalism but noir brought realism to the table. In particular, it effectively reflects the downsides of the various prosperous western states. Nordic Noir (or Scandinavian crime fiction) emerged after the establishment of the welfare state, a utopia of sorts for viewers of the model. The genre reflects the social aspects pertaining to Scandinavian culture at that time, including the dark subjects within. Despite the change to a more socially rich nation, nordic nations still faced demons pertaining to rights and crime. This visage of a dream state would not last forever and following WWII, despite the success of various projects and economies, profound changes took place that signified the end of the vision associated with the ‘welfare state.’ The arrival of Nordic noir depicted the feelings experienced by the populace. The welfare state was to offer a paradise of sorts, a utopia for some but held with it, misogyny, crime, and broken promises.
    Nordic noir’s popularity may arise from its content. It’s not making itself out to be fantasy but realistic. It appeals to concerns of the consumer and offers a connection of sorts. There is no holier than thou hero. As shown by the film Girl with a Dragon Tattoo, despite the fact that this girl is to be the protagonist (to a degree), she is, for all purposes, a killer. However, her backstory initiates a sense of empathy because the abuse hits close to home. Her story of abuse speaks to those that have been subjected to their own terrors and in a way, her ability to stand strong despite whats been thrown her way may relate to their own inner desires. Misogyny, rape, abuse, and murder are present in modern society. The genre does not attempt to hide what’s there or gloss over it. You will see characters that are more inclined to our own way of thinking rather than a protagonist with a set of morals. We see a gray lined character who’s moral compass is almost as screwed as the average individual. Characters are not made out to be defenders or supporters of world peace. Their problems in life resonate with consumer concerns. They are not perfect and failure is bound to happen.

  12. Scandinavian Noir is a popular genre of crime fiction written from the perspective of police officers. It follows the day to day action of police officers or detectives who are solving crimes. Over recent years, it has become increasingly popular in the Nordic countries, among others such as Great Britain. Works of this genre are typically realistic and to-the-point. They tend to see results from the Nordic Model and its equality, social justice and liberalism which function to hide certain dark hatreds seen in the Nordic countries. Some popular Scandinavian Noir titles include the book and film series The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, the Danish television series The Killing, which now has its own American adaption, and Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy among others.
    There are many reasons that one could speculate its popularity in this particular region of the world. People tend to react to what they see and what they are familiar with. Scandinavian countries as well as other countries where Scandinavian Noir find significant popularity tend to be dark and wet, gloomy places. As a genre, Scandinavian Noir tends to follow this time of dark and gloomy weather. As a result, those in Scandinavia are drawn to watching these dark shows or movies, as well as reading novels, that mimic a surrounding they are familiar with. Furthermore, the gloomy weather in the Nordic countries can certainly correlate with a more negative attitude from its inhabitants. They are more likely to be drawn to darker and moodier things.
    Furthermore, Scandinavian Noir tends to elude a more sophisticated tone than some popular shows from other countries, such as The United States and Great Britain. To watch these programs, you must really pay attention and think about what is happening on the screen or on the pages. Especially for foreign viewers, if the television show or film is not in your language, you must follow along with subtitles. This certainly draws viewers to the genre. Watching a more sophisticated show in which you must really pay attention creates a positive response with the viewers.
    Another thing that draws people to Scandinavian Noir is its ability to make its characters relatable to the viewers. While they might not be working as detectives and solving murders day to day, the personality traits and other activities of the characters are designed to be understandable to those watching or reading. They are not just detectives, but regular people with regular problems outside of work. The viewers are much more likely to connect with a character who isn’t seen as a hero, but a regular person doing their job.
    There are a handful of conditions that have lead to the growth and success of the Scandinavian Noir genre in the Nordic countries. With the familiar weather patterns, ability to relate to the characters and how the shows, films or books make you think, it is no surprise that people are continually drawn to this genre of crime. Scandinavian Noir not only continues to grow in the Nordic countries that it was formed in, but Western countries as well.

  13. Nordic Noir came to be after World War 2 from two men, Per Wahloo and Maj Sjowell. The two Marxist writers’ series, “Martin Beck”, is what is said to have started the trend of Nordic Noir from 1965-1975. Others will argue and say that Nordic Noir existed before then, and began with Mauritz Christopher Hansen when he published the psychological thriller,” Den Gale Christian” (The Mad Christian) in 1821. The Swedish crime film genre emerged when the Welfare model began to take shape. The two writers, Wahloo and Sjowell, wrote with the intent of criticizing Sweden’s welfare state. Nordic Noir is prominent in places like Sweden due to the continuous presence of violence and corruption in the welfare states, which seems to be a central theme in Scandinavian crime fiction. The Scandinavian fictions mirror the dark side of their society that was brought on by the Welfare model, and other things like the populations cultural anxieties. Scandinavian Nordic Noir became very popular in the western world after the publications of Henning Mankell’s novel, which often featured a depressive Inspector. Scandinavian Noir is carried out in Novels, a very popular one being Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and the successive other two novels in the series, the first one, was later turned into a film that won many awards in the western world. One award being the Saturn award for Best Horror/ Thriller Film. Not only is the genre carried out in novels but also films, which was seen with the above literary work. Just as popular, are the Nordic Noir TV series like, The Killing, Jar City, and Easy Money to name a few. The show The Killing, became a big hit in the United Kingdom when is was first aired over BBC4. The show quickly became embedded in the countries daily life, so much so, that even the sales of the articles of clothing worn by the shows lead detective were being sold like crazy and they could not keep up with the demand.
    Nordic Noir comes from a varying combinations of film noire genre and Scandinavian crime films. Nordic Noir is said to be made up of three key components: language, heroes, and setting. The Heroes in these films are often described as being “socially awkward” and are characters that typically keep to themselves, and are considered as being very goal oriented and determined. In Nordic Noir it is very common to have very strong female characters and leads. When it comes to the settings of where these films and writings are created, they are often described as being in prosperous places that are a referred to as a “soft society”. Although they are created in a “soft society” the setting of the work is often described as bleak and chilling, set in isolated locations to create a sense of darkness and loneliness. Some critics attribute the success of this genre to the realistic, relatable, and simple aspects it contains, and the ability for the audience to have a personal connection. It is also said that Scandinavia’s political system has something to do with the success of Nordic Noir. The justice system and liberalism of the Nordic Model is a way to cover up dark secrets tied to Scandinavia’s economy and politics.

  14. Scandinavian noir, or Nordic noir, is a genre of crime fiction which showcases the aspects of daily life in Scandinavia and how it interacts with crime. Arguably, the works of Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö can be named as the first implementation of Scandinavian noir in literature, specifically the Martin Beck series. Which sparked a new wave of crime fiction. Initially, Scandinavian noir was only popular in the Scandinavian countries, as they had a particular connection to not only the characters but to the landscape or setting as well. The genre eventually migrated to mainland Europe and then to the United States, where the genre only continued to gain popularity. For example, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, and its sequels, by Stieg Larsson were originally novels that were adapted to film in Scandinavia and then redone by American cinema with huge success. In addition, the American Netflix show “The Killing” is another adaption of Scandinavian Noir in American culture.

    Scandinavian noir can be characterized as having a distinctive and appealing style which depicts the protagonist, typically a police officer or detective, as a troubled individual with internal struggles and certainly not as a heroic figure. The genre lacks metaphorical comparisons and resists the use of colorful language, choosing to focus often times on the monotony of police work. Similar to the Scandinavian landscape, the language and themes are bleak and dark. Popular themes include murder, rape, and complex social issues such as the integration, or lack thereof, of migrant populations and the affects it has on the society as whole. Scandinavian noir depicts a struggle between the bleak social surface in Scandinavia and the horrors (murder, rape, racism, etc) that are present underneath.

    As stated by my classmates above, it is easy to rationalize why the genre emerged from the Nordic region. Although the Nordic countries rate as some of the happiest and safest countries in the world, this could potentially explain why such a dark genre has become so widely popular. The depressing and dismal story lines offer a glimpse into a darker reality that most Scandinavians do not experience. Moreover, in some cases the authors can use their works to critique the systems in place or the issues at hand in their country (for example immigration and racism), acting as an outlet for self-expression. In addition, the geography and climate of the region oftentimes mirrors the gloomy and ominous storylines that are present in Scandinavian noir. During the winter months, one can only expect to have sunlight for 6 hours of the day, which leaves the remaining hours dark. This serves as the perfect environment for one to write works which seek to depict the ominous aspects of society.

  15. Over the past decade or so, Scandinavian crime fiction has catapulted itself to global bestseller lists. Known for its intense, psychological stories, the literary genre has grown exponentially from a local phenomenon to a global audience. Typically, they are written through the perspective of a police officer who unearths underneath the cold Scandinavian surface some kind of dark and heinous crime such as rape or murder. Perhaps the most famous Nordic Noir novel is Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Even reaching the big screen, a movie was produced starring Daniel Craig, with its poster being displayed in the top left of the collage.

    These stories are often layered with social commentary on the state of Scandinavian race relations, crime, sex, and drugs. Immigration, especially in recent years following the crisis in Syria, has been a hot topic in a region typically fairly open to foreigners. As of 2016, 23% of Sweden’s population is made up of immigrants, a staggeringly large amount for a country that in the past has been clear in distinguishing itself from the other Scandinavian states. This has been commented on by authors such as Hennig Mankell, whose novel Faceless Killers (pictured in the bottom left image) portrayed Sweden descending into violence due to xenophobia. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is well known for its attacks on misogyny and often uses real statistics regarding rape and sexual harassment. “18 percent of the women in Sweden have at one time been threatened by a man,” concludes the first chapter of the novel.

    Following the explosion of metal in the United States and Britain in the late 70s and 80s, the genre eventually found its way to Scandinavia where it caught on like a wildfire. It quickly found a new home in Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. Finland as well is very into metal, with it containing the highest amount of metal bands per capita in the world.

    The inevitable question that comes up when discussing Scandinavia’s fascination with metal and noir is simply: why there? Why is a place that’s citizenry often listed among the happiest in the world so enthralled with such dark topics? Some have speculated that the cold, often barren geography plays a part in the bleakness of their cultural exports. Perhaps the readers of Nordic Noir realize that while they generally may be a happy people, there is still a dark underside to their society that is often overlooked. While surely not a cause necessarily, I believe there might be a correlation between the secularism is the countries and the popularity of metal. In early 90s, members of the Norwegian black metal scene were believed to be responsible for burning at least 50 churches. Those convicted for church burnings showed little remorse and would go on to describe their actions as a symbolic “retaliation” against Christianity.

    https://theculturetrip.com/europe/sweden/articles/nordic-noir-the-rise-of-scandinavian-crime-fiction/
    Lords of Chaos: The Bloody Rise of the Satanic Metal Underground

  16. The term Nordic noir is associated with a region (Scandinavia), with a mood (gloomy and bleak), with a look (dark and grim), and with strong characters and a compelling narrative. Nordic Noir first emerged in the 40s due to discussions on the emergence of the welfare state. Generally it refers to crime films or novels. The Economist described Nordic Noir as having three key elements: language, heroes and setting. The characters can be seen as morally ambiguous individuals who prefer being by themselves. They are described as ‘socially awkward, goal orientated and fiercely determined, there is an emphasis on reality over action’ and this makes them relatable to the viewing audience. The Nordic Noir characters are flawed, real people. They don’t always act as a hero should. They lie, they cheat, they don’t always strive for a happy ending. In Nordic Noir, the stories usually unfold in bleak, chilling landscapes, permeated by a sense of isolation and loneliness.
    One reason why it is so popular is because of the setting and our fascination with what we view as exotic. They take place in areas that are sparsely populated and that have a cold climate with lots of snow, making it attractive for crime series. Another reason is because while it is easy to relate to the characters and generally follows an intriguing story line, it also typically discusses current social issues.
    References: https://www.academia.edu/8190109/What_is_Nordic_Noir
    http://criminology.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780190264079.001.0001/acrefore-9780190264079-e-294

  17. Nordic, or Scandinavian Noir, has had far reaching effects on culture outside of northern Europe. It is a form of fictional writing that has a crime and police theme focus. The works are often very dark and take aim at covering some very intense but real topics such as rape and murder. The genre adapted out of the realization that there was nothing quite like it yet that had been done. Initially we saw the inception of this arrive following World War II as Europe as a whole was trying to revive their culture and stabilize their nation. Some critics have claimed that the development of Scandinavian Noir has served as that cultures distinguishing contribution to the world of art, writing, and film. It’s language, heroes, and settings really help to set aside the Scandinavian Noir from other similar crime or police dramas from the United States or United Kingdom. Many shows, however, in those nations have adopted their scripts and plots from Scandinavian Noir and have been adopted into American and British shows and have been very popular in their showings. One recent and very popular example was that of the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo which was originally written as a work of Scandinavian Noir by Swedish author Stieg Larsson. The book was received very well by American readers which eventually led for its adaption into a script for a movie which also was very successful in its showing. This genre also attempts to adopted a lot of the social, cultural, and economic values that the Scandinavian nations have advocating for equality and social and economic justice. The deep, underlying tones and often detailed stories often require a committed and well-read audience to follow along and understand the plot and the themes being portrayed. The genres dark theme has drawn some to conclude that it reflects the regions dark and cold climate much similar to the claim for the countries’ love for heavy metal music. Some have claimed that this creates a way for many to relate personally to this genre and that its focus on personal issues allows it to resonate well amongst other cultures for their viewers to easily enjoy even if some of the deeper underlying inferences are not picked up. As immigration continues to grow the population of countries in the area, particularly Sweden, the theme of immigration and immigrants has grown tremendously in the content of Scandinavian Noir. It focuses on issue faced by immigrants and natives surrounding the issue and since this issue is not restricted to this part of the world, if and when adopted by other nations like the United States or United Kingdom, it is likely to be well received and popular there as well. Scandinavian Noir is a defining cultural contribution of the region to the world and is well recognized throughout other cultures. As the popularity continues to grow worldwide, the Scandinavian countries will continue to increase the production and development of it more and more to meet the continuing demand.

  18. Nordic Noir, also called Scandinavian Noir, is the most popular form of film, television, and stories that come out of the northern region of Europe. The genre is of a darker variety that usually involves psychological thrillers of murder, mystery, and a suspenseful journey to solve that which is puzzling the characters. To be able to fully understand the popularity of such dark subject matter, I feel that we need to first understand the physical geography and climate of the Nordic North. The major countries that comprise the Norden are Norway Sweden, and Denmark, collectively known as Scandinavia, Finland, Iceland, The Faroe Islands, and Greenland. These countries are heavily formed by the existence, current and past, and movement of glaciers. The mountains in Iceland are actually eroding volcanoes as Iceland sits atop the Mid-Atlantic Ridge which produces geothermal gradient that the islands utilize for energy. Finland is home to some of the oldest exposed rock on the entire earth. Volcanoes and glaciers, oldest rocks near newest rocks, and an area close to the North Pole where certain times of year are cold and primarily dark, getting around four to six hours of sunlight per day, can cause for an attitude adjustment. Lack of vitamin D, which is absorbed through sunlight, has been proven to cause a more depressive state of mind. Much of this is why I speculate that entertainment of a more serious and depraved nature is so popular amongst the inhabitants here.
    Another reason I speculate Nordic Noir’s popularity is the general history of Nordic peoples. Vikings are some of the oldest ancestry traced to the region, even though they have a rich history of nomadic herders followed by settlements and cultivation, and these people were quite savage. Vikings would raid villages outside of their home area and kidnap women to take home to care for the children the produced with them through rape while pillaging the villages for goods. If that is not a dark history, I do not know what it. From early times, Nordic countries have shown a darker taste for storytelling, the world renowned folk tale of Beowulf is a prime historic example of this. One of the most well-known present-day Nordic Noir book and film series is The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, written by Swedish author Stieg Larsson and published posthumously. Fox recently did a remake of a series titled The Killing, which was a popular television series from Denmark and Sweden. This series is a dark police drama about a young woman, murdered, whose body was found near a bridge and the case haunts the detective in charge. These two examples set a theme of popular stories in the region.
    In addition to dark and thrilling books, television, and movies, metal music is more popular in this region than anywhere else in the world, which I feel is a direct correlation to the theme at hand as well. Sweden and Norway boast anywhere from 400-600 metal bands per 1 million people in the populations. That is a lot of head banging and makes my neck sore just thinking about it. Overall, I feel the darkness has found its niche in the Nordic countries and I personally cannot wait to visit them one day.

  19. Nordic Noir is a genre of literature, film, TV, etc. that is extremely popular around the world today, but especially in the Scandinavian countries, such as Sweden, Finland, Norway, etc. It originated in the mid 1900’s, after World War II, and rose to be one of the most popular types of fiction in the area. The Martin Beck detective series, by Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo, was one of the very first noir series to appear. Noir first appeared as literature that consisted of stories about crime. This was a new idea and a new style and changed the whole world of fiction. The novels featured a wide range of mystery- very focused on detectives and police with their day to day functions and protocol. The novels usually focus on very dark and tragic ideas and concepts such as murder, rape, anti-immigration, and prejudice deeply rooted in society. Often times, the stories will have twists and turns against characters you weren’t expecting to be the culprit, and reveals secrets and scandals of powerful people. This genre of fiction is also used as another form of addressing the issues within the author’s society. Many include under-laying messages and morals about the world around their readers at the time. The entire series became even more wildly popular as time went on. Some popular titles in the literature genre are The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and the Kurt Wallander detective series. One film that has been really successful in the genre is The Killing. The stories usually include an obvious “hero” figure, but generally these characters are not obviously heroic. They tend to be normal, everyday, hard-working individuals but somewhat introverted and worn down.
    There’s a lot of possible reasons why this particular area in the world highly favors these dark tales but it would be difficult to pinpoint exactly why. Metal music is extremely popular in this area too and these could very well correlate with each other. One large reason that Nordic Noir could be extremely popular is that it is used to express societal concerns and corruption or major issues that affect these countries and the people who live in them. These countries potentially could use this as a major way or form to express civil unrest. Another reason is also that these countries are some of the wettest areas on the earth. It rains so much there and is cloudy a lot so the scene and feel of these novels tie into their everyday lives. We all know that one friend who loves rain, but for the majority of us, we’d get a little bummed out if it rained all the time and we never got a chance to see the sun. Lastly, it could just be their culture. In American culture, we just seem to love reality TVs and drama shows and in Scandinavia, they might just really like crime scene stories.

  20. Nordic noir is a crime fiction genre with the point of view being that of a police officer. The general settings are bleak and the tone dark. It contains strong characters and compelling narratives. The themes highlight the contrasts between the general view of their society as bland and generally good against the reality of the murder and misdeeds hiding underneath. The genre is associated with books, television shows, and films. The genre is transnational; it is recognized and consumed all over the world. Many writers of this genre are recognized all over the world and have sold millions of copies with some authors even been listed among the bestselling/most powerful authors in the world. The very recognizable The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo which has sold over 85 million copies worldwide is Nordic Noir. The first novels of Nordic Noir are traced back to the writer duo, Sjöwall and Wahlöö who created the detective Martin Beck in their novels published in the 1960s. Another big name in the genre is Henning Mankell who created the character Inspector Wallander and is considered the ‘godfather’ of the genre. This genre has ties back to the American genre referred to as Noir. The term Noir comes from the French word for black. This term was coined first by French film critics after the large influx of American entertainment post-World War II to describe the American crime novels and television shows that contained similar plots and tones crime novels published in France in 1945 under the generic title “Serie Noire.”

    Now the question of why this genre has become so popular in Scandinavia. Many reference the fact that these Scandinavian countries that these Nordic writers come from are considered “soft societies.” They are prosperous and ordered. The citizens of these countries are protection through welfare from the beginning of their lives to the end. The belief is that this comprehensive welfare system hides the dark underside of their society. Nordic Noir tales excite the populations of these countries because they unearth the bad and stain this perception of a peaceful, decent society. These stories ask the question of whether something has gone wrong in this Scandinavian dream of a perfect society. While researching I found an interesting article that focused on Noir in Sweden and related this infatuation with the unearthing of the evil in society directly to the assassination of the Swedish prime minister in the 1980’s. He was shot while walking home from the movies with his wife at 11:00 pm with no security which was a common occurrence for him to be without security. This rocked the nation and the witch hunt and botched police investigation that followed brought to light many questionable characters within, and the writer argues had psychological effects on the Swedish population that these crime writers are able to play on. Also, the similarities in the bleak settings of the books to that of the environment of Scandinavia cannot be ignored. The authors use the areas around them to create this gloomy settings and moods that touch the nerves of their readers.

  21. Over the past decade, Nordic Noir has dominated the global bestseller lists. Praised for its simple language, thrilling plots, and social criticism, Nordic Noir is a growing industry worth millions of dollars. Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo are considered to be the modern pioneers of the genre after their “Martin Beck series broke the mold of previous norms in crime fiction. They came to the realization that there was a massive unexplored territory in which crime drama could be used to exploit the social problems of the world. Kerstin Bergman notes that “what made Sjöwall and Wahlöö’s novels stand out from previous crime fiction – and what made it so influential in the following decades – was, above all, the conscious inclusion of a critical perspective on Swedish society. Although Sjowall and Wahloo essentially created the genre in 1965, it would not be launched into modern stardom until Stieg Larson’s “Millennium” trilogy was published in 2005. To put the absolute boom in popularity of the Nordic noir genre in perspective, the only author to outsell Stieg Larsson in the past decade is Dan Brown. Larsson’s trilogy was adapted into two blockbuster movies and sold over 15 million copies in the United States alone. Larsson is also the creator of “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”, which was developed into quite a successful film in the US.
    The novels are often considered to be of the “police procedural” subgenre, which highlights the incredibly average and monotonous daily work of police. Most of the success of this genre is attributed to its simply realistic (and usually depressing) portrayal that is stripped of any unnecessary words. Protagonists are generally detectives worn down by life and do not come across as a typical hero figure. Another pillar of success could be attributed to the political system of the Scandinavian countries where liberalistic ideals, social justice, and equality are portrayed as keeping dark secrets hidden from light. The “Millennium” trilogy for example focuses on misogyny and rape while another popular title “Faceless Killers” focuses on Sweden’s failure to initiate the inclusion of its new immigrant population.
    Why have these novels become so popular within Nordic countries? As other students have commented on this blog, I believe it has to do with the overall bleak and depressing nature of this region of the world. This begs the question, if the country you live in is so physically bleak and depressing for most of the year, why would want to wade deeper into that feeling of harsh hopelessness that Nordic Noir and metal music incite? The world may never know, but it has spawned a groundbreaking movement nevertheless. Some critics and writer claim that the end is near for Nordic Noir. Ian Rankin, writer of the Inspector Rebus series, argues that ‘Scandinavian crime writers are no better than Scottish ones, they just have better PR’. These critics believe that the distinctive simplistic style of the genre is flawed, but when you look at global scales, the world seems to disagree.

  22. Jaylan cline
    Essentially, Nordic noir is an old tradition story telling that had taken place during the medieval times of Iceland and Scandinavia. For the most part, it was originally Pegan literature but later it became so much more in Northern Europe shaping its culture for entertainment purposes. Later, in the early 20th century you begin to see Nordic noir taking its shape within the novels being released during that time frame. Per Wahoo and Maj Sjowall popularized the genre with their famous hit series Martin Beck. As for books, this was already a big thing for the culture. The reason why they call it Nordic/Scandi because this sort of style of film making and publishing was only seen in this part of Europe.
    Although this style of genre was popular in that region, it quickly spread to different places like America, France, and Britain. One thing that I noticed about the books specifically, is that a lot of the imaginings deals with ice. Its almost like some sort of correlation with the physical geography. Which makes sense because it’s a very cold region also, the nordic noir is very dark you even notice this with a lot of the pop culture from that area. Heavy metal Is very awkward but unique but it’s still dark. Yet again, it assimilates into the American culture. You begin to see a lot of that in the American film production and music. Punk rock for example, appears a little after world war II, and later you hear screamo on the radio which is a genre of music where band lead singer literally just screams. Which it all evolved from metal music.
    Another similarity I’ve seen dealing with the Nordic genre is the perspective of a cop dealing with a crime scene. More specifically, the show/book’s plot deals with murder, and the cop is usually a homicide detective trying to figure out who did what. So why murder? Although, murder is usually the case, there has been some other famous Nordic noir genre of movies and books like the “girl with the dragon tattoo” which is mainly just suspense.
    People in general just seems have an attraction to violent and murderous shows makes want to question everyone’s mental state. The nordic genre it’s so widespread that it even put some their best authors in some outstanding categories. I personally enjoy watching a lot of what they have to offer “the killing” is one of my favorite shows. Simplify because it gives some sort of realistic feel to how a situation could end up. It gives you a lot insight on homicide detectives including the dull parts, while keeping you on the edge of your seat. Another reason why I think Nordic noir is so popular in Scandinavia is because its cultural and been around for hundreds of years and now has evolved into a world-wide trend of movies and books. Also, think about the history of northern Europe. Vikings were very violent and culturally different from places that was geographically close to them.

    http://criminology.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780190264079.001.0001/acrefore-9780190264079-e-294
    http://www.academia.edu/8190109/What_is_Nordic_Noir

  23. More than a half century age, partners in crime Per Sjöwall and Maj Sjöwall, a Swedish journalist and a young publisher met as friends and found out they thought the same way. The time they met was Sweden became the first well-fare state. The couple wrote a series of ten detective stories about a pessimistic but decent policeman Martin Beck. An idea coming from the failed expectations of the Sweden government. In which, that empowered their idea of using detective fiction to analyze the state of the nation. The couple’s project took them a decade to complete. The final book was published in 1975.
    The Western world was going through a sexual and love revolution, not so much the Nordic countries. Nordic Noir in global terms known as crime fiction associated with books, films, and television series from the region to the first Crime Fiction writers including countries of Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Iceland are the home to Crime Fiction books commonly known has Nordic Noir. Crime Fiction became extremely popular Northern Europe. All these countries have differences, but they have same history and relations with culture. The weather is somewhat the same with long harsh winters and short summers. I would like the winter would keep people mostly indoors and less likely being physically active outside. People may use their time exercising their brain by creative writing, reading critical thinking books.
    The 1940’s film characterized the Nordic countries as gloomy, shadowy compositions, and morally gray with vivid characters and compelling narrative to the outside viewers. Later, the crime novels have become phenomenon around the world. It was marketed as Nordic Noir for the crime and setting. Each book will have some sort of resemblances to the original founders of crime fiction. In addition, music culture is presumed dark for the popularity of Heavy Metal. I think it must do with cold winters for the heavy music and style. Black clothes would be naturally warming and look better on fair skin. Another, People with longer hair and beards are using their natural hair to keep warm. The religion used in heavy metal maybe rebellion against churches and beliefs. They are extremely religious nations, and possibility religion is viewed dark to people because of stories of good and evil, sacrifices, torture, and etc. My personal thoughts. I don’t see these countries characterized depressing, dark, and wicked. I do know the weather can play a role on our mood. It is true people who live in harsh long winters tend to have higher suicide rates in that region. As example, Washington state’s suicide rate was the highest in the States for depression was a huge problem. Many people may have a dark image of Northern Europe. According to Happy Index, these countries are on the top 20 lists for happiest nations. In contrast to the United States, the Nordic countries make the U.S. look miserable compared to their happiness. Shockingly, the crime rate is not high. I find somewhat odd because their books are so descriptive about crime.

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